I’ve been fascinated by acrylic pouring for a while now and love watching all those YouTube videos, quite mesmerizing. So when a local artist advertised an acrylic pour workshop in Geraldton (my home town) I jumped at the chance. Hmmm now how could I possibly transfer some of these techniques to polymer clay. Now I looooooove creating art beads so that was my challenge.  I wanted to create an acrylic pour polymer clay veneer and then manipulate the veneer to create a bead. In this case, with the particular brand of paint I used, I had success, and with a little tweaking I think this technique could be taken alot further.

So let’s have a look at how I created some tube beads with an acrylic pour veneer.

Firstly I decided to use plain white clay – both kato and premo. I decided I would use a flow medium called Floetrol mixed with Ironlak Fluid Acrylics in one test and Ironlak Fluid Acrylics on their own in the other test.  I mixed 1 part Floetrol with 1 part fluid acrylic.

First I used the Ironlak Fluid Acrylics (with no additives) and poured straight from the bottle onto the raw clay.  Because the clay acts as a “resist” I moved the paint around with my finger to cover the entire piece of clay. Of course there was more paint than I needed so I let a little drip off the edge and by doing so I ended up with a nice marbled pattern.  By turning the tile in different directions you (kind of) control the paint flow.  You can also use a straw to blow the paint in different directions.  I did this with both Premo clay and Kato clay and didn’t notice much of a difference between the two.  The Ironlak Fluids are beautiful to use on raw clay and flowed well.  I then left them to dry.

Now to experiment with Ironlak Fluid Acrylics mixed with Floetrol (remember the ratio was 1:1).  I poured them straight from the little container onto the Kato raw clay and used my fingers again to “move” the paint around.  I also used a straw and I held the tile on a few different angles to create movement in the paint. For the Premo, I decided to pour the paint mix into a cup and then pour this directly onto the clay surface.  I moved it around a little with my finger and ended up with some really nice patterning.  I then left these to dry.

It’s a little difficult to see the difference between the two but the Floetrol/Paint mix had a much better flow and I ended up with some really interesting areas.

Let’s look a little closer.

Once all the paint was dry I noticed the surface of each one and the clay with Floetrol/paint mix dried matt.  The other dried shiny.

The next step was to create beads using these veneers.  The veneers were easily manipulated and I found this paint actually stretched beautifully with the clay.  Some I’ve tried haven’t worked like this so it was a nice surprise.

Next was to test the curing process and that all went well.  All the beads cured well and I have to point out here I put them all in the oven at once and cured at the recommended temp for Kato – actually it was probably a little higher and they all survived beautifully.  I did notice after curing however, the matt beads (or the beads with Floetrol/paint mix) ended up shiny.  This is a pic of them all out of the oven after curing.

 

The last step in creating these beads is, of course, sealing them.  I tried two with Kato liquid clay and cured with a heat gun and I tried two with PearlEx Varnish.  I have to say the Floetrol/Paint mix didn’t like the heat from the heat gun and you’ll note it actually discoloured the paint.  There’s a noticable difference and I didn’t really like it.  The varnish was a good option and there are probably many more sealers on the market that could be used – these are just the two I had on hand.  You can see the difference in these two beads in particular.   The one on the left is Floetrol/paint mix sealed with PearlEx Varnish and the one on the right is Floetrol/paint mix sealed with kato liquid clay and cured with a heat gun.

So in conclusion, I looooove playing around with acrylic paints on raw clay.  It’s kinda like marbling which I’ve always had a fascination for.  As I mentioned right at the beginning, there are many variables and so many different options here.  It’s all about working out what you like and what works for you.

So that’s it for today everyone.  I hope you enjoyed the post and don’t forget to sign up for my newsletter for more tips and tricks with polymer clay.

Thanks everyone. Bye for now.

Love Deb

 

 

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33 Comments on "Acrylic Pouring on Raw Polymer Clay"

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Donna Haggerty
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How great of you to share your testing with us! I am doing something similar but have little yet to show for it. I was also finding that not using a pouring medium and just using high flow paints was interesting in itself. Next up you should try adding some silicone lubricant (if you haven’t already). I found Myriam at Myriam’s Nature gives a good suggestion for a silicone substitute that is inexpensive. I can only imagine how much fun you had with this. Very glad you were able to stop and share with us. Very much appreciated! Good to… Read more »
Debbie Crothers
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Hey Donna, yes I found too I got some great results with this particular brand of paint which was really nice. I have tried adding silicone oil to the paint/floetrol mix and in another experiment, spraying it on top of the wet paint to try and create cells. The silicone reacted badly with the paint and left lots of divots which were quite ugly looking. Possibly resin would have worked – they were flat pieces. I tried to seal with kato liquid and the silicone repelled the liquid clay – just didn’t like it so it wasn’t overly successful. I… Read more »
Donna Haggerty
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ah, interesting that the paints or inks used can make that much of a difference. good to know! Again, thanks for sharing your learnings with us. I know that takes time to document and write it up.

Erin Prais-hintz
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This is awesome and comes at just the right time for me. I am mounting this exhibit in a month and I am attempting to imitate in clay what I have been doing with paint. I have been doing a lot with mokume gane, but this technique, or a variation of it, will open up some additional possibilities for me to try! Thanks for sharing such a great experiment. You are doing exciting things, Miss Debbie, and it is fascinating to watch! Enjoy the day! Erin

Debbie Crothers
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Thanks Erin, what a lovely comment. I’m glad you found it helpful. Good luck with your exhibition. xx

Kris Shotts
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Sent, Have you ever tried using Epson salt in a pour? We used to do it years ago. Not sure if it would work on polymer clay but, what the heck give it a try.

Debbie Crothers
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You know I haven’t tried that Kris, thanks for the suggestion.

Trudy
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you are awesome, loved it thankyou

Debbie Crothers
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Awww thanks Trudy, that’s so sweet of you honey.

Nan Smith
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Love your tutorial Debbie! Thank you so much for showing your results with such great explanations of the whole process. I too have been fascinated by acrylic pouring and the concept of using it with my first passion, polymer clay, just blows my mind! I will will definitely be trying this once I move and get my new workspace up and running. As always you are a brilliant star in the polymer universe!

Debbie Crothers
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Aww Nan, what a beautiful thing to say – that’s so sweet of you. I hope your new work space is up and running soon so you can get to creating. Thanks so much for your lovely comment.

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